Did you know that if the plates are blue on a buffet line, that color was a strategic decision? Why? According to the psychology behind it, the color is an appetite suppressant.

Makes sense:

 

One article suggests that it’s because, aside from blueberries and a few blue-purple potatoes, blue doesn’t exist as a natural food color. (Article: Color & Appetite Matters).

That’s what Brian Markovich and Amy Upthagrove from Mount Mary University told an audience at our community conference Mediasite Experience 2018 yesterday in Madison, Wis. It’s that type of sensory relations topic that students in Mount Mary’s Food Science program study. But its food lab where all the magic was supposed to happen wasn’t quite cutting it.

Mount Mary University in Milwaukee, Wis. is an innovative institution when it comes to unique use cases of video (check out how it’s using Mediasite in its sign language course). So it created a new state-of-the-art million-dollar lab that turns every class into a cooking show.

Picture eight kitchen stations with TVs and iPads, a demonstration area for an instructor or guest cook, and Mediasite so students see every angle of the class. That could include a close-up view of the cook’s stovetop, cutting area, the recipe, etc.

That’s a far cry from the old set-up, which Brian and Amy described as “a glorified grandmother’s kitchen” where students huddled around the instructor and couldn’t watch anything on-demand.

Brian and Amy’s team asked themselves how they could use technology to give them a leg up.

“We found out that Mediasite could do everything we just talked about and more,” Brian said.

Even better yet, everything is managed in a one-touch capture of four simultaneous views. This created a low-impact recording option for the cooking professors’ while giving the viewer full control of what to watch.

“A cook who’s also managing a class at the same time isn’t able to switch the screen to make sure the viewer is watching the right thing at any given time. They wanted to grab all the streams at one time and that’s where Mediasite came in,” he said. “The cook never has to worry about switching views.”

This isn't the only unique use of Mediasite at the university. Learn more about how it uses video in its ASL course.